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Thread: I hate working on my NT.

  1. #11
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    Re: I hate working on my NT.

    I must admit I am also not fond of doing maintenance. But, I also restore cars. MG and Model Ts. Being 70ish It is a little tougher to crawl under vehicles and negotiate the adventures. But, the flip side is I'm pleased I can still do it. I just bought the NT and have only started digging into the upgrades I want to do. Again, the pleasure these endeavors give far outweigh any negatives. The gentleman above that hates to get up in the morning to his chosen vocation breaks my heart. Everyday is a new adventure and we have choices. I have had many motorcycles over the last 40 years and have done most of the maintenance. Yes, not my favorite thing but most of the bikes had names (Some x-rated) had a few wives also and their maintenance was a challenge as well.


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  2. #12
    rc_heli_nut's Avatar
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    Re: I hate working on my NT.

    I have found the NT to be quite easy to work on. Yes there's some Tupperware to remove for access to the engine, the main thing to do is keep fasteners with the plastic pieces upon removal. Magnet trays are commonly available and cheap, get yourself a few.

    A small cordless hex driver will also be handy. DeWalt makes a nice 3-cell Lithium driver that works well. I usually break loose the panel fasteners with hand tools, then spin them out and back home with cordless tools. Saves a lot of elbow grease.

    Brad

  3. #13
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    Re: I hate working on my NT.

    I wish that I could say the same for Baltimore City. I was born and raised here, mostly in rough neighborhoods. For sure, everyone in Baltimore is not bad, but we have more than our fair share of thugs, criminals, drug addicts, juvenile delinquents, vandals and crooked cops. No one in my apartment building sees these things take place. If they did witness these activities, most would call me or the police. I am the only person in my senior building who rides a motorcycle. I am looking into moving to Thailand when I retire.

  4. #14
    Site Supporter WVRider's Avatar
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    Re: I hate working on my NT.

    I worked as a Honda motorcycle mechanic for over 10 years (1980 to 1990), have worked on all my own from 1975 to current and believe me, the NT isn't as difficult to work on as some. They all have their little quirks however it's all part of it. One of the biggest time consumers is the valves and I have learned, with the NT, I do not need to do the valves as often as the manual says and have gone much longer between those increments with no different results. A little less time in the valve adjustment portion, more time on the road. Like every bike I've ever owned you can find little short cuts that save a bunch of time when doing certain procedures. Enjoy the ride !
    Duane

    It's all about the Journey....... Not a Destination !

  5. #15
    JohnC's Avatar
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    Re: I hate working on my NT.

    Quote Originally Posted by junglejim View Post
    I don't like the way Honda uses so many different types/sizes of screws on one part. It requires multiple trips to the tool box that I don't believe are necessary.
    On my FJR, If I am not pulling the wheels, I can do almost all the maintenance with 8, 10, 12, 14, and 17mm wrenches (sockets are handy, though), 3 Allen wrenches, and 3 Torx wrenches. The tupperware on a Series III though is a PITA. It's like a wooden Chinese puzzle that snaps together, then uses a handful of fasteners, mostly hidden, to bolt the plastic to the frame. Access to the battery and fuses is also a little tricky.


    Quote Originally Posted by banjoboy View Post
    I'm with Karl. My tool kit I carry when I travel is my AAA tow card, my cell phone, and my VISA card. Handles pretty much anything, but I've never had to use it.
    Terry
    I travel with 20 lbs. of tools (I weighed my tool bag), including an air compressor and a tire patch kit. It's a carryover from my old Britbike days. I have never used any of the tools on the road, but I have lent tools to broke down bikers twice.

    It is partially "the umbrella philosophy": If you carry an umbrella, it won't rain, but the first time you forget it . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Tarman View Post
    I have a theory about bike theft. My hunch is that bikes like the NT or the Connies I owned before it are pretty safe from theft. Harleys and sport bikes are much more likely to be stolen. So far, that theory has worked for 18 years.
    FJR's are also under represented. There aren't many of them, and they are pretty reliable so there's no great demand for parts.
    Last edited by JohnC; 06-17-2017 at 04:06 AM.
    John Casteel - 2013 FJR
    Corinth, TX (just south of Denton on I35E)
    Spearfish 2015, added MT, ID, UT, NV

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