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Thread: Orange Electronics TPMS

  1. #1
    mikesim's Avatar
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    Orange Electronics TPMS

    As posted earlier, I replaced the tires on Traveller last week and at the same time added the Orange Electronics TPMS (tire pressure monitoring system). After rding with the system for a week, I thought I would offer my first impressions for those who may be inclined to add this system to their NT.

    The TPMS consists of an electronic module and two pressure sensors. The sensors, while identical are clearly labeled F1 (front) and R2 (rear) which allows the TPMS to differentiate between the two. Unlike some TPMS systems, the pressure sensors are mounted on the wheel in place of the conventional valve stem and thus the tires must be removed for installation. While this is more of a hassle than the valve stem cap type systems, it does offer two advantages. The sensors are virtually theft proof (unless you have a VERY determined thief) and because they are mounted within the wheel tire assembly the system offers temperature monitoring as well as pressure. Why is temperature important, you ask? Well, it offers anal guys like me more stuff to monitor and it can also forewarn you of pending wheel bearing/final drive issues and tire carcass failure, both of which can generate excessive heat.

    The sensor install is pretty straightforward, just remove the old valve stems and replace with the sensors. There is a torque spec for the sensor that must be adhered to 35 in/lbs if memory serves since over or under-torquing can result in air leakage. Since my tires were being replaced, I had the dealer install the sensors for me.

    The display module is approximately 2"Wx1.5"Hx,75"D. It is entirely sealed and weatherproof as all of the circuitry is potted in place with epoxy. There are two switches on the face of the display module labeled "FUN" (function) and SET (set). The electrical connections are a two wire setup requiring a switched B+ and ground. The power requirements of the system are ~150mA and can be added safely to any switched circuit. The sensors by the way have their own internal lithium ion cells with a life of approximatly three years. When the batteries eventually die, the sensors must be replaced as the batteries are not serviceable.

    Once installed and powered up for the first time, the user must set the desired warning parameters which is easily done using the FUN and SET switches. The rider can set both the low and high pressure thresholds and also the upper temperature threshold. Once the system has been programmed to your desired setpoints the system will constantly monitor the tire pressures and temperatures anythime the key is on. On initial startup, the display will show a series of dashes (---) while it polls the sensors for info. The sensors have built in inertia switches which power down the sensors (to preserve battery life) when not moving. After a few moments, the display will show the current values. The display can be toggled between pressure or temperature, or can be set to toggle back and forth bewteen the two. When the pressures/temperatures are within the desired range, the display will be backlit by blue LED's. Should any of the values fall out of the programmed range, the display will switch to a red backlight and the offending parameter will flash on/off attracting the riders attention alerting him to the situation.

    I intially set my system to a quite narrow pressure/temeparture range to "test" the system operation. It worked as intended. I then adjusted the parameters to a more normal range for everyday use.

    Some observations I have noted so far. The tires begin to warm up after only a mile or two of riding. The rear tire runs considerably warmer than the front. This is presumably due to the larger rear tire size and the additonal heat generated by the final drive. The display is quite visible except when bright sun is peeking over your shoulder and the display "washes out" somewhat. Still readable, but the clarity suffers a tad. At night however the display really stands out.

    Here are a couple of pix with the system installed.




    I hope this info helps anyone who is considering a similar purchase.

    Mike
    "tis better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt...." Mark Twain

  2. #2
    Trouble Nicole's Avatar
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    Re: Orange Electronics TPMS

    Thanks for the review ...

    Do you know the expected life of the batteries in the tire units?
    No one gets out of this life alive; Why live it in fear?
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    Administrator Mellow's Avatar
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    Re: Orange Electronics TPMS

    Thanks Mike, I was wondering how well these would work w/NT rims.

    Nicole - 3 years is the battery life and then you can order new sensors, I don't believe you can replace the batteries as they appear to be epoxied within the sensor.
    Don't sweat the small stuff, it's all small stuff"

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    Trouble Nicole's Avatar
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    Re: Orange Electronics TPMS

    I would expect that the whole thing would need to be replaced, just couldnt imagine a way they could get the battery outside and have it survive.

    Thanks

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    Re: Orange Electronics TPMS

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole View Post
    I would expect that the whole thing would need to be replaced, just couldnt imagine a way they could get the battery outside and have it survive.

    Thanks
    The display doesn't have to be replaced... that can be programmed for new/replacement sensors so it should not be a completely re-purchase of the whole system. Hope that helps.

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    Trouble Nicole's Avatar
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    Re: Orange Electronics TPMS

    It does thanks

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    Re: Orange Electronics TPMS

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole View Post
    Thanks for the review ...

    Do you know the expected life of the batteries in the tire units?
    Durn! I meant to put that in my write-up,,, sorry 'bout that. Mellow is right, 3 years is the expected life of the batts in the sensors.

    Mike

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    Moderator Phil Tarman's Avatar
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    Re: Orange Electronics TPMS

    You may have said it earlier, but what did you pay for thie whole setup and where did you get it?
    Phil Tarman
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    Re: Orange Electronics TPMS

    Rick, I've notices as much as 8psi increase in the rear riding in mild temps.. I assume as the temps rise so will the pressure by a few psi... the front is typically 1/2 the increase of the rear.. I assume part of that is all the engine heat pushing towards the rear along with the fact that it's the drive wheel so there's more friction.. maybe it's all that, I don't know.

    I don't pay attention to the temps much, I did at first but then decided I didn't care as long as the air pressure was there.. You can choose 1 of 3 functions on the display, 1) display the psi 2) display the temp 3) alternate between the two every few seconds.

    As Mike said, I don't think you can extrapolate all that much info from the display other than just psi and temp of the tires and that's it... There's probably so many other factors affecting the psi/temp readings that it would be tough to isolate one as being due to preload or a loaded bike, etc.

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